Independence

Energy independence also means giving power to the people. Solar energy can generate true prosperity by granting more people than ever before the chance to have a stake in the field of clean energy. We aim to democratize and decentralize energy production so electricity and profits go from the hands of a select few into the hands of many. 

Committing to energy independence means freedom from electricity generators, distributors, and retailers. While our own U.S. Department of Energy projects global oil production to peak in 20442, scientists agree on the environmental devastation that this prediction poses to all communities.

Unlike fossil fuels, the sun’s energy is infinite. Our entire planet’s energy needs could be supplied by solar if an area the size of West Virginia was covered in solar panels, per one study.1 In 2015, the United States spent more than 4,000 dollars per person on energy.2 Solar keeps money in our community and does not support exporting oil jobs to foreign countries with lax environmental regulations. With the help of solar power, our nation diverges from a reliance on fossil fuels while individuals enjoy lower utility fees.

Energy independence also means giving power to the people. Solar energy can generate true prosperity by granting more people than ever before the chance to have a stake in the field of clean energy. We aim to democratize and decentralize energy production so electricity and profits go from the hands of a select few into the hands of many.

It is now easier than ever to begin the process towards energy independence. New York residents in 2016 received a 25% federal Solar Tax Credit when installing a solar system on your residence. Current estimates find that it may only take 7 years for solar to pay for itself.3 Switching to solar, however, permits energy independence on day one. With life-cycles longer than thirty years, low maintenance costs, and a constant source of energy, the future savings outweigh the costs.

1.       May, Nadine. “The Eco-balance of a Solar Electricity Transmission from North Africa to Europe.” Technical University of Braunschweig: Faculty for Physics and Geological Sciences. 17 Aug. 2005. Web.

2.       Center for Sustainable Systems, University of Michigan. 2016. “U.S. Energy System Factsheet.” Pub. No. CSS03-11. <http://css.snre.umich.edu/sites/default/files/U.S._Energy_System_Factsheet_CSS04-14.pdf>.

3.       Tarbi, Luke. “New York State’s Solar Tax Credit: 25% savings on your energy related costs.” Energy Sage, U.S. Department of Energy. April 2. 2016. Web. <http://news.energysage.com/new-york-state-solar-tax-credit-how-does-it-work/>.